Learning Plan Data and Observations- June 2016

Comparisons, observations and analysis of data collected from survey for grade 4/5 between the February data (left) and the June data (right):

The responses between February and June remained constant when students were asked what makes them feel calm and relaxed  at school.  Silent reading, break times and specific subjects continued to be the most frequent responses.

There was a change in responses between February and June when students were asked what helps them feel calm.  Initially student’s top responses were quiet (27.9%) and being with friends (13.5%).  In June, silent reading became a more specific response to quiet (23%) but using breathing techniques became a new response at (13%).  This is significant as breathing techniques were introduced to students through the Zones of Regulation program.

Between February and June the responses remained relatively the same when students were asked what makes them feel anxious or stressed at school.  They continued to be a specific subject (especially math), and tests.  In the second survey we did observe that all students could identify things that made them feel anxious or stressed. In the initial survey, 13.4% of students had answered either nothing or don’t know.

Students clearly had developed more strategies for reducing the feeling of anxiety and worry by June.  The initial survey results had 35.3% of students respond to the question with nothing/don’t know or had no response.  By June, all students were able to name specific strategies.  The most frequent strategies identified in June were breathing techniques (19%), asking for help (9%) exercise (9%) and using a stress ball (9%).  The responses tended to be somewhat child specific with 16 specific strategies identified in June as compared to 9 in February.

Significant changes were also observed with students understanding of what things in the classroom make it difficult for them to concentrate.  In February 40.8% of students responded to the question with no response or don’t know.  By June, this number dropped to 3%. Students consistently responded (both February and June) with noise and talking as being the main things in their classroom making it difficult for them to concentrate.

Responses were similar between February and June when students were asked what they do to help deal with distractions.  Wearing headphones, ignoring distractions and telling others to be quiet were the top responses.  The main change was that by June, all students had a specific response as compared to February when 10.7% had no response.

Between February and June students were better able to identify changes they would make to their classroom to help them concentrate.  In February 37.7% of students responded to the question with nothing/don’t know or no response.  By June, only 14% of students responded with nothing.  The most popular response continued to be quiet (11.8% in February and 24% in June).

Comparisons, observations and analysis of data collected from survey for grade 3 and 3/4  between the February data (left) and the June data (right):

When grade 3 and 3/4 students were asked when they feel most calm, the responses remained largely the same with silent reading overwhelmingly being the activity students identified most (51% February, 47% June).

When grade 3 and 3/4 students were asked what helps you feel calm at school the change in responses was quite dramatic between February and June. In February, 21.8% of students could not identify anything that made them feel calm at school.  By June, every student could identify the things in school that made them feel calm and relaxed. Quiet and silent reading remained the most significant things making them feel calm and relaxed at school.

The responses between February and June remained constant when students were asked what makes them feel anxious or stressed when at school.  Both peer conflicts and noise continued to be the most frequent responses.

The most significant change observed in the data between February and June was that almost all students by June could identify a personal strategy for reducing feelings of anxiety and worry at school.  In February 25% of students could not identify one strategy.  This dropped to 12% by June.

The responses between February and June remained constant when students were asked what things make it difficult for them to concentrate at school.  Both talking and noise continued to be the most frequent responses.

The responses between February and June remained constant when students were asked what they do to help deal with distractions at school.  Both making space quieter/wearing headphones and ignoring distractions continued to be the most frequent responses.

The most significant change in responses between February and June is that students were able to identify changes.  When asked if there was something in the classroom they would change to help them concentrate, only 9% did not have a response.  This had been 30.9% in February.

Comparisons, observations and analysis of data collected from survey for grade 1 between the February data (left) and the June data (right):

When asked when students feel most calm and relaxed, there was little change between the data collected in February and June.  Students were able to list the activities they find most calming.

When asked what helps you feel calm, students responses were much the same although there was an addition in June of the “sparkle jar”, which is a calming tool introduced through the program,  Zones of Regulation.

When asked what makes students feel anxious and stressed at school, there was little change between the data collected in February and June.  Students continued to find un-kind behaviour from others and noise to be the greatest stress at school.

The most significant change for students in grade 1 when asked what can be done to reduce the feeling of worry or anxiety at school, has been their ownership in making change.  A significant number of students (38%) suggested regulating themselves by asking the teacher to move to a quiet space away from others.

In February, noise (26.3%) and talking (47.4%) were the cause of making it difficult for students to concentrate.  In June, noise and talking had dropped to only 8%, while people bugging, and/or poking one another had increased to 60%.  What is unclear is why the change?  Has talking and noise decreased significantly in the classroom?  Has this made other causes now more significant?  It will be interesting to hear from teachers as to their thoughts on this significant change.

When asked what they do to deal with distractions in the classroom, there have been some significant changes between the February and June data and the implementation of the Zones of Regulation program.  The data suggests that students have learned many new strategies for dealing with distractions in the classroom.  In February, 42% of grade one students using ignoring distractions as their key strategy.  By June, this had dropped to 23% and students identified numerous additional strategies.

The most significant change when students were asked if there was something they wanted to change in the classroom to help them concentrate was the decrease in number of things student would change.  In February, students could identify 6 different changes.  This dropped to only two in June.

Summary observations and trends:

• Students in all grades consistently identified silent reading as a time they feel calm and relaxed at school.

• Students in grades 3, 3/4 and 4/5 all identified quiet  as helping to make them feel calm.

• Students in grades 1 and 4/5 added new strategies between February and June for helping them feel calm.

• Students were consistent between February and June in identifying what makes them feel anxious or stressed at school.

• Students in intermediate grades find math and tests a source of stress.

• Students in primary grades find peer conflict and noise sources of stress.

• Between February and June, students identified more strategies for dealing with feelings of anxiety and worry.

• For grades 3, 3/4 and 4/5, talking and noise were identified by students as things in the classroom making it difficult for them to concentrate.

• For grade 3, 3/4 and 4/5, students continued to find headphones, ignoring behaviour and telling others to be quiet help deal with distractions in the classroom.

• For grade 1 students, students learned numerous new strategies for dealing with distractions in the classroom.

• For grades 3, 3/4 and 4/5 students were better able to identify things they would change in the classroom to help them concentrate.